Foal Color – Chart for Registration

THIS SECTION IS PART OF THE RULES AND REGULATIONS, SECTION FOUR
Under The Foal Coat: Clues for Getting the Right Color

US Arabian Horse Registry records the following coat colors: bay, chestnut, grey, black, roan and white (see photos of horses with actual color examples). Most Purebred Arabians are registered as foals between the ages of three and six months. Sometimes, this makes it difficult to correctly specify the coat color on the registration application because foals are usually born chestnut or dull bay and change colors after losing their foal coats. If the foal’s color changes after registration, this form can be submitted noting, it is a color change with the form shown below.

Most foals will begin to lose their fuzzy baby hair around the eyes and nostrils and the root of the tail first, followed by the legs. Check the color of the smooth hair in these areas. Usually, that will be the foal’s permanent color.

Thank you to the Jockey Club for their descriptions
Bay: The entire coat of the horse may vary from a yellow-tan to a bright auburn. The mane, tail and lower portion of the legs are always black, unless white markings are present.
Black: The entire coat of the horse is black, including the muzzle, the flanks, the mane, tail and legs, unless white markings are present.
Dark Bay/Brown: The entire coat of the horse will vary from a brown, with areas of tan on the shoulders, head and flanks, to a dark brown, with tan areas seen only in the flanks and/or muzzle. The mane, tail and lower portion of the legs are always black, unless white markings are present.
Chestnut: The entire coat of the horse may vary from a red-yellow to a golden-yellow. The mane, tail and legs are usually variations of coat color, unless white markings are present. Any shade of pure or reddish brown with mane, tail and points of the same or a lighter shade. The mane, tail and legs are usually variations of coat color, unless white markings are present. Chestnut foals who will not grey are generally born with pink skin around the eyes that will darken in a few days.
Gray: The majority of the coat of the horse is a mixture of black and white hairs. The mane, tail and legs may be either black or gray, unless white markings are present.
Roan:  Roan is a horse coat color pattern characterized by an even mixture of colored and white hairs on the body, while the head and “points”—lower legs, mane and tail—are mostly solid-colored. Horses with roan coats have white hairs evenly intermingled throughout any other color
White: White horse has white hair and fully or largely unpigmented (pink) skin. These horses are born white, with blue or brown eyes, and remain white for life.

Rabicano is the term usually used. The foal should be registered as the color of the base coat. The majority of the coat of the horse is a mixture of red and white hairs or brown and white hairs. The mane, tail and legs may be black, chestnut or roan, unless white markings are present. It may be difficult to tell the difference between a rose grey and a roan at first. Roans show their permanent coat color after shedding their foal coats. Unlike greys, they do not dapple nor do they progressively lighten in color. Most roans will have a dark head, while grey foals will first turn light on the head.

How Do I Know if the Foal will be Grey As an Adult?
Here are some helpful hints if you are having trouble determining if your foal will be grey as an adult: · Always remember to look for pink skin underneath the white hairs and mark “yes” or “no” in the Underlying Pink Skin boxes. · If it is feasible, clip and/or wet the legs and face to make it easy to identify pink skin. · If the hoof color is light or parti, you will almost always find pink skin above the coronet band. · Only white markings with underlying pink skin are “true” markings on a grey horse as when the foal sheds to its adult coat, those markings will disappear. If there are no dark areas around the eyes and muzzle and the foal is born with a colored foal coat, the foal will be grey If the eyes develop a “raccoon” look around the outside of the eyes, the foal will be grey.

Does this answer your questions? If not, please call or email the Registry office for assistance.

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